Tag Archives: Linguistics

Phatic – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phatic In linguistics, a phatic expression is one whose only function is to perform a social task, as opposed to conveying information… For example, “you’re welcome” is not intended to convey the message that the hearer is welcome; it is a phatic response to being thanked, which in turn is a phatic whose function is […]

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Mondegreen – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mondegreen Mondegreens are always good for a larf, but nothing beats the one that coined the phrase: When I was a child, my mother used to read aloud to me from Percy’s Reliques, and one of my favorite poems began, as I remember: Ye Highlands and ye Lowlands, Oh, where hae ye been? They hae […]

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English Tongue Twisters | 1st International Collection of Tongue Twisters

http://www.uebersetzung.at/twister/en.htm Some of these tongue twisters are well known. Others are not terribly challenging. Some are downright impossible. This one, however, is both effective and amusing. There was a fisherman named Fisher who fished for some fish in a fissure. Till a fish with a grin, pulled the fisherman in. Now they’re fishing the fissure […]

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Holy Sprog Christmas Nativity spoof by Fast Shows Chanel 9

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_d4Dxntv24 What better way to celebrate the holiday than with a star, a manger, three kings, some shepherds, and Charlie Higson in hotpants. You can keep your Boney M; I like my Christmas disco nonsensical and with plenty of facial hair.

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Pleonasm – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleonasm Pleonasm is the use of more words (or even word-parts) than necessary to express an idea clearly.

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Exclamation mark – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exclamation_point The history and usage of the exclamation mark, with a terrific alternative name: In typesetting or printing (and therefore when spelling text out orally), the exclamation mark is called a screamer or bang.

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Michael Hann on | Media | The Guardian

http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,,2026533,00.html Guardian article discusses the increasing use of “meh”. Only a few paragraphs, and it doesn’t mention the fairly obvious Simpsons origin ’til near the end. All in all, a low-key waste of time and effort. Anyone else see the irony, here?

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http://www.languagemonitor.com/ Word nerds would do best to take a deep breath before plugging through this site; Its devotion to language is as strong as its aversion to grammar and punctuation.

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Collective Nouns

http://www.bikwil.com/Vintage41/Collective-Nouns.html A gimmick of collective nouns: column of accountants pound of carpenters wince of dentists hush of librarians consternation of mothers flush of plumbers goggle of tourists absence of waiters

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http://www.bartleby.com/61/images/indoeuro.jpg I’m finding myself in the middle of another themed StumbleDay. Here’s a well-mapped, fascinating look at the evolution of language in Western Eurasia; A genealogical chart for tongues.

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